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Manabe Akikatsu

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A stone marker stands on the former site of Myômanji, a temple in Kyoto's Teramachi, where Akikatsu stayed during his time in Kyoto in 1858-1859.

Manabe Akikatsu was a daimyô of Sabae han in Echizen province, and served for a time as Kyoto shoshidai, Osaka-jôdai (steward of Osaka castle), and as rôjû. He is particularly known for his involvement in the Ansei Purge, and in obtaining Imperial approval for the Five-Power Treaties[2] of the Ansei era.

The third son of Manabe Akihiro, he was adopted by his older brother Manabe Akisane and became the 7th lord of Sabae domain at age 11. He served the shogunate in a number of positions, including Jisha Bugyô (Magistrate of Temples and Shrines), Steward of Osaka Castle, and Kyoto Shoshidai, before being appointed rôjû, one of the chief councilors of the shogunate, in 1840.[3]

He was forced to retire from that position three years later[3], however, due to disagreements with Mizuno Tadakuni.

He was restored to his position as rôjû by Ii Naosuke in 1858, and handled a variety of difficult situations, including the Ansei Purges, the Five-Power Treaties, a shogunal succession dispute[4], and suppression of sonnô jôi rebels in Kyoto. The following year, however, Akikatsu was forced into retirement once again after falling from Naosuke's favor.[3]

Preceded by
Doi Toshitsura
Kyoto shoshidai
1838-1840
Succeeded by
Makino Tadamasa

References

  • "Manabe Akikatsu." Encyclopedia of Japan. Kodansha. Accessed via JapanKnowledge online resource, 15 December 2010.
  • "Manabe Akikatsu." Nihon kokugo daijiten. Shogakkan. Accessed via JapanKnowledge online resource, 15 December 2010.
  1. According to some sources, he was born in 1802.
  2. That is, the Harris Treaty with the United States, and the Treaties of Amity and Commerce with the Netherlands, Russia, France, and United Kingdom that followed.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Manabe Akikatsu." Nihon Jinmei Daijiten. Kodansha. Accessed via JapanKnowledge online resource, 15 December 2010.
  4. "Manabe Akikatsu." Digital Daijisen. Shogakukan. Accessed via JapanKnowledge online resource, 15 December 2010.
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