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Difference between revisions of "Princess Rishu"

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(Created page with "*''Born: 1725'' *''Died: 1764'' *''Other Names'': 嘉久宮 ''(Kaku-no-miya)'', 寿厳理長 ''(Jugen richou)'', 逸厳理秀 ''(Itsugen Rishuu)'' *''Japanese'': 理...")
 
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*''Japanese'': 理秀女王 ''(Rishuu joou)''
 
*''Japanese'': 理秀女王 ''(Rishuu joou)''
  
Rishû joô, or Queen Rishû, was the fourth daughter of [[Emperor Nakamikado]].
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Rishû Joô, or Princess Rishû, was the fourth daughter of [[Emperor Nakamikado]].
  
 
She entered the temple of [[Hokyo-ji|Hôkyô-ji]]<!--宝鏡寺--> in [[1731]]/8, at the age of six, and served initially as meals-announcer (喝食), a typical honorary role within a [[Zen]] temple. She formally took the tonsure two years later, in [[1733]]/9, as a nun associated with both Hôkyô-ji and [[Daiji-ji]], which were under the same chief priest (or abbot). In [[1740]]/3, she received permission from the emperor to wear purple robes (the robes of a high priest), and became head of [[Keiai-ji]], the chief of the [[Five Nunneries]] (''ama-gozan'') of [[Kyoto]].
 
She entered the temple of [[Hokyo-ji|Hôkyô-ji]]<!--宝鏡寺--> in [[1731]]/8, at the age of six, and served initially as meals-announcer (喝食), a typical honorary role within a [[Zen]] temple. She formally took the tonsure two years later, in [[1733]]/9, as a nun associated with both Hôkyô-ji and [[Daiji-ji]], which were under the same chief priest (or abbot). In [[1740]]/3, she received permission from the emperor to wear purple robes (the robes of a high priest), and became head of [[Keiai-ji]], the chief of the [[Five Nunneries]] (''ama-gozan'') of [[Kyoto]].

Revision as of 00:20, 13 September 2019

  • Born: 1725
  • Died: 1764
  • Other Names: 嘉久宮 (Kaku-no-miya), 寿厳理長 (Jugen richou), 逸厳理秀 (Itsugen Rishuu)
  • Japanese: 理秀女王 (Rishuu joou)

Rishû Joô, or Princess Rishû, was the fourth daughter of Emperor Nakamikado.

She entered the temple of Hôkyô-ji in 1731/8, at the age of six, and served initially as meals-announcer (喝食), a typical honorary role within a Zen temple. She formally took the tonsure two years later, in 1733/9, as a nun associated with both Hôkyô-ji and Daiji-ji, which were under the same chief priest (or abbot). In 1740/3, she received permission from the emperor to wear purple robes (the robes of a high priest), and became head of Keiai-ji, the chief of the Five Nunneries (ama-gozan) of Kyoto.

Following her death in 1764, Rishû was buried at Shinnyo-ji in Kyoto.

References

  • Gallery label, "Hôkyôjigû he Kakunomiya okata gonyûji," National Museum of Japanese History.[1]
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