Samurai-Archives

Difference between revisions of "Moko Shurai Ekotoba"

From SamuraiWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
 
(One intermediate revision by one user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
*Japanese:蒙古襲来絵詞(Mouko Shûrai Ekotoba)
+
*''Japanese'': 蒙古襲来絵詞 ''(Mouko Shuurai Ekotoba)''
The Mongol invasion scroll, or ''Moko Shurai Ekotoba'' was commissioned in [[1293]] by [[Takezaki Suenaga]], a warrior who had fought in both [[Mongol invasions]].
+
  
==External Link==
+
The Mongol Invasion Scroll, or ''Môko Shûrai Ekotoba'' was commissioned in [[1293]] by [[Takezaki Suenaga]], a warrior who had fought in both [[Mongol invasions]].
  
 +
Unlike most handscroll paintings of major military events, which were produced long afterwards as part of a narrative / storytelling tradition, Takezaki's ''Môkô Shûrai Ekotoba'' is roughly contemporary to its subject, having been produced as a record of service, and a petition for reward.
 +
 +
==References==
 +
*Karl Friday, ''Samurai Warfare and the State in Early Medieval Japan'', Routledge (2004), 17.
 +
 +
==External Link==
 
* [http://www.bowdoin.edu/mongol-scrolls/ Scrolls of the Mongol Invasions of Japan]
 
* [http://www.bowdoin.edu/mongol-scrolls/ Scrolls of the Mongol Invasions of Japan]
  

Latest revision as of 19:51, 11 October 2013

  • Japanese: 蒙古襲来絵詞 (Mouko Shuurai Ekotoba)

The Mongol Invasion Scroll, or Môko Shûrai Ekotoba was commissioned in 1293 by Takezaki Suenaga, a warrior who had fought in both Mongol invasions.

Unlike most handscroll paintings of major military events, which were produced long afterwards as part of a narrative / storytelling tradition, Takezaki's Môkô Shûrai Ekotoba is roughly contemporary to its subject, having been produced as a record of service, and a petition for reward.

[edit] References

  • Karl Friday, Samurai Warfare and the State in Early Medieval Japan, Routledge (2004), 17.

[edit] External Link

Personal tools